Picking Sides

I try to avoid inundating my kids with STAAR test prep nonsense, but next week they are required to take a mock exam that requires them to write a persuasive essay.  In my opinion, the topic is pretty lame:  “Is it better to dream big or be realistic?”  So today I had my students practice persuasion techniques by having an “open carry” debate.  We do live in Texas, and this new law just went into effect last Friday, and it’s something a lot of them have very real and very strong opinions about.

I started the lesson by clearly defining what open carry means for our debate (not necessarily what the law specifically states).  I allowed students to ask any clarifying questions to make sure they understood what we were talking about when we mention open carry.

Then I used a resource from ReadWriteThink and just used white-out to remove “kairos” since we focus more on logos and pathos in STAAR writing.  Remember STAAR only allows 26 lines for an essay, so it’s hard to incorporate all persuasive strategies (but not impossible). For this review I wanted to reinforce the two strategies I feel like my students use and understand the most.

We reviewed the definitions and then I made 3 large columns on the whiteboard labeled:  KEEP, ?, and STOP.  I emphasized that I was using the verbs “keep/stop” instead of just “agree/disagree” because I wanted to students to work on convincing others of their position and persuade them to take action.  I then had my kids write their names in the column that best fit their current position regarding open carry.

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In each class, I had at least 2 undecided and almost an even number of students on the opposing sides. I had a feeling this would happen so it made my lesson work even easier: I told the “keep” and “stop” sides it was now their job to convince the undecided students to join their side by creating sound arguments that had either logical and/or emotional appeals.

I allowed each side just 5 minutes to create their argument since time was running out. While the two sides deliberated, I talked with the students in the middle. I asked why they were undecided and what kind of argument might change their mind. From the three classes that participated, I had at least one undecided student from each period tell me that they would have to hear a solid example of why open carry is safe or unsafe.

Again, because of the limited amount of time remaining, I only gave each side 3 minutes to present their positions. My “success criteria” on the board simply said: be respectful, be patient, and speak loud enough to be heard. My students did a great job of trying to incorporate both logical and emotional appeals. One of the strongest opposing arguments I heard was that open carry could possibly cause a young child to think it’s always okay to carry a gun and make them more inclined to go touch one if they see it in public. They mentioned that a kid might accidentally make someone else’s gun shoot in public because they think it’s a toy. I saw a few people react to that with faces of “I hadn’t thought about that”.

After both sides presented their cases, I allowed the students in the middle to either pick a side or ask questions if they still weren’t convinced. This is where the debate started to get even more lively, but my students did an excellent job of letting both sides speak without interruption. In each class, only one kid from the middle wound up choosing a new side.

I began to wrap up the lesson by asking the students in the middle to explain why they did or did not change their mind about joining either side. Each time I was told that they just wanted stronger and more believable examples.

I closed the lesson by reminding students how important elaboration is in writing, and that the examples that they provide in their persuasive essay must be well-supported and should appeal to logic and emotion.

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